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scrounge: /skrounj/ informal verb: to actively seek [books] from any available source

Category results for 'board-books'.

The world of preschool literature is replete with books about counting, shapes, and the alphabet, but that doesn't mean there aren't still unique perspectives on these staple topics. A B See is a fresh look at the letters of the alphabet as composed by smaller pictures of things that all begin with the letter they collectively portray.

It sounds simple, and it is, but the intricate details and positioning of each thing or animal makes the book fun and absorbing to look at. Each picture is raised slightly to give the pages some texture, and the use of complementary colors and varying hues gives the pictures some "pop." Each letter page also contains a brief alliterative sentence about objects in the pictures, but it's the illustrations that really capture my attention.

At the end there's an index that lists the name of each item pictured in each letter in case it isn't apparant what's being depicted. 

Scrounged From: Rainbow Resource

Format: Board Book
Author/Illustrator: Elizabeth Doyle
Pages: 32
Content Advisory: None

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Paper Peek Colors is a large and sturdy board book that introduces colors with large cut-out shapes over a background of cut-paper art of various shades of the featured color. When you turn the page, the area behind the cut-out shape gives 5 different objects (of ascending amounts) to find among the cut-paper art on the opposite side. 

When I saw the search-and-find portion, I thought it was a bit advanced for the 0-3 age range, but it's actually clever because it makes this book appeal to a larger range of ages. My 1-year-old enjoys reading the simple parts of the book, while my 4-year-old and 7-year-old have both enjoyed searching for the hidden objects. So I'd say it was a hit in our house.

My only major complaint is that my favorite color is missing! Purple! I know space is limited, but you'd think that at least all the secondary colors should be included, especially when pink, brown, white, and black are also included. Also, the white page is really mostly gray. But regardless, this is a fun book, and the art is beautiful the way the various shades of each color are arranged together.

(In compliance with FTC guidelines, I disclose that I received this book for free through LibraryThing Early Reviewers. I was not required to write a positive review.)

Scrounged From: LibraryThing

Format: Board book
Author/Illustrator: Chihiro Takeuchi
Pages: 38
Content Advisory: None

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I previously enjoyed (and reviewed) Anne's Colors, another book in this series. Anne's Feelings is just as cute, and also a great way to introduce preschoolers to the character of Anne. 

The illustrations are fabric, and capture Anne's spirit well without being too "cutesy." I love the way the soft tones work together, and how Anne's hair has just enough contrast to stand out a little bit. 

In this book, we explore different emotions that Anne feels, based on scenes from the Anne of Green Gables books. From excitement at the prospect of having a dish of ice cream, to anger at Gilbert Blythe, we experience many different emotions, and see several other familiar characters along with Anne. Of course, since context is very helpful when understanding emotions, this book will probably benefit from some explanations, especially when it comes to feelings such as "the depths of despair"! Still fun, and this book is nicely oversized for ease of reading.

(In compliance with FTC guidelines, I disclose that I received this book for free through LibraryThing Early Reviewers. I was not required to write a positive review.)

Scrounged From: LibraryThing giveaway

Format: Board book
Author/Illustrator: Kelly Hill
Pages: 22
Content Advisory: None

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As a lover of literature, I've been intrigued by the BabyLit series of board books that uses aspects of classic novels to introduce young children to concepts like counting, colors, opposites, etc., as well as books in other series such as Anne's Colors. So I was excited to see that something similar had been done with Bible stories.

Let There Be Light is an "opposites primer" focusing on the creation story in Genesis. Each double page contains an opposite word on each side, and a Bible verse associated with that particular contrast. One thing I liked was that not every verse was from the Genesis story. By also using verses from books like Psalms and Jeremiah, the book takes on a grander scope, and emphasizes the creation from more than one point of view. Occasionally "primers" can become a bit contrived when they reach a bit too far to make a story fit a concept, but I didn't get that feeling from this one.

I also love the illustrations, especially the use of contrasting colors, and the way that even the concepts that are used a bit abstractly in this story (quiet/loud, work/rest) are portrayed in simple, colorful ways that make sense. This would make a great gift for a baby or toddler!

(Thanks to NetGalley for the review copy.)

Scrounged From: NetGalley

Format: Kindle
Author: Danielle Hitchen
Illustrator: Jessica Blanchard
Pages: 20
Content Advisory: None

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We've read a few of the board books in this series, and found them a very fun and foundational way to introduce science topics to preschoolers. In Baby Loves Quarks!  we learn that quarks are like the building blocks of everything around us, because they make up atoms, which make up molecules.

I like how this is communicated in an ordinary way, with the illustration of a baby building a tower of blocks, which keeps the concept at a concrete level that young children can understand. We've also enjoyed Baby Loves Aerospace Engineering! which looks at flight, but begins simply, with a bird.

Scrounged From: Our local library

Format: Board book
Author: Ruth Spiro
Illustrator: Irene Chan
Pages: 20
Content Advisory: None

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